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Historical values of homes in Central Florida.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

Historical values of homes in Central Florida

This graph shows the median end of year value of homes in Central Florida, since the year 1989. When looking at the graph you will see that historically  prices in our area go up 3.11% a year. This graph also shows us  how the housing bubble effected our market and how unrealistically it effected our market values. The graph also shows us that in the year of 2010 we hit the bottom, with the median value of only $105,000. This was a huge drop from the historically high value of $250,000 in 2006, which as we all know by now were inflated by faulty appraisals and pick a payment mortgages.  Let’s look at what is happening today. The median home value is up to $122,900 and rising steadily. The trend line tells us that the median value should be $140,000. We can expect to return to the historic trend by between the end of 2013 and the middle of 2014. It is my feeling that the market is correcting itself. We can not expect any jump in the market value as buyers are careful and do not intend to get burned again.  

 

 

 

Haiti needs us.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

When tropical storm Isaac went over Haiti in the end August this year, the media started to tell us that two years and eight months after the earthquake that devastated the country, 390,000 people are still living in tents. This news had a big effect on us at The Viking Team, Realty and made us think about what we can do to help these unfortunate people. We started to look for more information and found on the UN website that still after all this time, 600,000 people are still displaced, of them 390,000 are living in tents. We also found that 588,000 have been infected by cholera, which has killed 7,500. Isaac killed 24 people and 3 are missing. In our search to find out what we can do, we found The Caring Home Project. The Caring Home Project was founded by Frank McKinney with the purpose helping the people of Haiti by among other building self-efficient villages. Today they have built 17 villages with 50 homes, a school, orphanage, community center, medical clinic, water management projects, wind generators and agricultural programs, just to mention few things of what they do. To learn more about the Caring Home Project, follow this link: http://www.frank-mckinney.com/mission_objectives.aspx

We at The Viking Team, Realty realize that we cannot solve all the problems of the people of Haiti, but we can help. From now on we will donate $100 of every closing that we have to the foundation, we will also encourage the other Realtor in the deal, the seller, the buyer and the Title Company to do the same. It is our hope that for every closing that we have that we can raise $500 for the foundation. This will mean that with every 7th closing we have raised enough funds to build a home for a family of eight. The cost of building a concrete home with a metal roof is $3,500. This home has two bedrooms, kitchen and a porch. We will also encourage other Realtors to do the same, as many hands working together make the work easy.

Candle Beggar, Kertasnýkir.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

Candle Beggar

Candle Beggar arrives on Christmas Eve Day, 24 December. In former times, candles were the brightest lights available to people. They were so rare and precious that all children longed to have their very own candle for Christmas. And poor Candle Beggar – well, he also longed for a candle. The National Museum is open between 11 and 12 on Christmas Eve Day, to welcome Candle Beggar.

The Kertasníkir, Candle Beggarthirteenth was Candle Beggar
- ‘twas cold, I believe,
if he was not the last
of the lot on Christmas Eve.

He trailed after the little ones
who, like happy sprites,
ran about the farm with
their fine tallow lights.

From the poem The Yuletide Lads by Jóhannes úr Kötlum.                                                                   

English translation by Hallberg Hallmundsson.

 

 

Meat Hook, Kjetkrókur.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

Meat Hook

St. Thorlák's Day, 23 December, is the day of Meat Hook's arrival. Meat Hook was crazy about meat. In the old days he would lower a long stick through the chimney and snag a smoked leg of lamb hanging from the rafters, or a piece of smoked lamb from the pot. In those days the smoked lamb, which is traditional Icelandic Christmas fare, was cooked on St. Thorlák's Day.

Ketkrókur, Meat HookMeat Hook, the twelfth one,
his talent would display
as soon as he arrived
on Saint Thorlak's Day.

He snagged himself a morsel
of meet of any sort,
although his hook at times was
a tiny bit short.

 

From the poem The Yuletide Lads by Jóhannes úr Kötlum.                             

English translation by Hallberg Hallmundsson.

Door Sniffer, Gáttaþefur.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

Door Sniffer

Door Sniffer comes to town on 22 December. He is easily recognised by his huge nose. He loved the smell of cakes and lace bread – sometimes called leaf bread – when they were being prepared for Christmas, and always tried to steal one or two.

Gáttaþefur, Door SnifferEleventh was Door Sniffer,
a doltish lad and gross.
He never got a cold, yet had
a huge, sensitive nose.

He caught the scent of lace bread
while leagues away still
and ran toward it weightless
as wind over dale and hill.

 

From the poem The Yuletide Lads by Jóhannes úr Kötlum.                             

English translation by Hallberg Hallmundsson.

 

Door Sniffer, Gáttaþefur.

Window Peeper, Gluggagægir.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

Window Peeper

December 21 is when Window Peeper visits. This Lad was not as greedy as some of his brothers, he just liked to peep through the windows and sometimes nicked the toys that he saw.

Gluggagægir, Window PeeperThe tenth was Window Peeper,
a weird little twit,
who stepped up to the window
and stole a peek through it.

And whatever was inside
to which his eye was drawn,
he most likely attempted
to take later on.

 

From the poem The Yuletide Lads by Jóhannes úr Kötlum.                             

English translation by Hallberg Hallmundsson.

 

Window Peeper, Gluggagægir.

Sausage Swiper, Bjúgnakrækir.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

Sausage Swiper

On 20 December we are expecting Sausage Swiper. He loved to eat sausages and stole them whenever he had a chance.

Bjúgnakrækir, Sausage SwiperThe ninth was Sausage Swiper,
a shifty pilferer.
He climbed up to the rafters
and raided food from there.

Sitting on a crossbeam
in soot and in smoke,
he fed himself on sausage
fit for gentlefolk.

 

From the poem The Yuletide Lads by Jóhannes úr Kötlum.                             

English translation by Hallberg Hallmundsson.

 

Skyr Gobbler, Skyrgámur.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

Skyr Gobbler

On 19 December we welcome the Yule Lad called Skyr Gobbler. His favourite is an Icelandic dairy product called skyr, which is similar to yogurt. He likes it so much that he used to sneak into the pantry and gobble all the skyr out of the skyr tub.

Skyrgámur, Skyr GobbleSkyr Gobbler, the eighth,
was an awful stupid bloke.
He lambasted the skyr tub
till the lid on it broke.

Then he stood there gobbling
- his greed was well known -
until, about to burst,
he would bleat, howl and groan.

 

From the poem The Yuletide Lads by Jóhannes úr Kötlum.                             

English translation by Hallberg Hallmundsson.

 

Skyr Gobbler, Skyrgámur

Door Slammer, Hurðaskellir.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

Door Slammer

Door Slammer comes to town on 18 December. He always made a lot of noise when he walked around, slamming doors and such, so people could hardly get any rest. He still has a habit of slamming doors and always does when he visits the National Museum.

Hurðaskellir, Door SlammerThe seventh was Door Slammer,
a sorry, vulgar chap:
When people in the twilight
would take a little nap,

he was happy as a lark
with the havoc he could wreak,
slamming doors and hearing
the hinges on them squeak.

 

From the poem The Yuletide Lads by Jóhannes úr Kötlum.                             

English translation by Hallberg Hallmundsson.

 

Bowl Licker, Askasleikir.

by Petur Sigurdsson, Broker and Erna Sigurdsson, Real

Bowl Licker

Bowl Licker comes to town on 17 December. In the past, Icelanders ate from lidded wooden bowls that they sometimes kept under the bed or on the floor. Bowl Licker would hide under the bed, and if someone put their bowl on the floor he grabbed it and licked the inside clean.

Askasleikir, Bowl LickerBowl Licker, the sixth one,
was shockingly ill bred.
From underneath the bedsteads
he stuck his ugly head.

And when the bowls were left
to be licked by dog or cat,
he snatched them for himself
- he was sure good at that!

 

From the poem The Yuletide Lads by Jóhannes úr Kötlum.                             

English translation by Hallberg Hallmundsson.

 

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 33